Biography


Artist Portrait



Growing up in Oklahoma, not far from the Fort Sill Reservation, Margie spent her early years in an isolated atmosphere, her horse and her dog as her only companions. In the evenings the haunting sounds of the Indian drums could be heard. Days were spent riding, helping to herd cattle and listening to the stories of the old cowboys who were her friends. Needing an outlet for her creative drive, Margie would draw with any material at hand, sculpting figures from soap or clay from the creekbed.


Since those early years, Jackson has become an internationally recognized artist, with work in corporate, private and municipal collections both here and abroad. She has illustrated magazines and corporate publications. She has illustrated, written and designed the public relations book for a municipal chamber of commerce and also collaborated on the logo for the city of Yelm, Washington. Margie has won numerous awards and has been included in prestigious invitational and juried shows nationwide. Her work has been represented in several magazines and publications including: Art West, Southwest Art, Western Horseman, Art in Arizona, Bechtel Magazine and many more.


Although Margie created many of her early works with no formal art training, she has since studied at Western Wyoming College, University of Hartford, The House of Bronze, as well as many other workshops with other well known artists, including Edward Fraughton-Master Sculptor. Margie has also actively shared her knowledge with others through presenting her own workshops.


Margie, her husband Billy and their four small children traveled extensively for many years, finally settling on a small farm outside Yelm, Washington. Margie spent her days in the peaceful atmosphere of her studio overlooking LaCamas Creek. Around her were gathered her horses, cattle and many other assorted animals. There, she was able to create in bronze and to paint her impressions of life, achieving a beauty only possible through intimate knowledge of her subject matter. Jackson is equally proficient in portraying the human form in any setting. Animals and humans seem to come alive in her skilled hands.


Margie and her husband Billy now maintain a home and studio in the Historical district of the City of Lacey, Washington, along with a small gallery showroom where she continues to paint and sculpt.

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